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GoatsAndTigersGameOrBaghChal - DGWiki
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Goats And Tigers Game Or Bagh Chal

Bagh Chal is the national game of Nepal and has been played throughout the ages. Bagh Chal, which literally translates as "Tiger, Movement" is also called: "game of Tiger Tactics" or "Goats and Tigers".

This game belongs to the family of hunting games in which each player either has a few "predators" or has "preys" which are more numerous. The goats block the tigers and the tigers eat the goats…

How to play

Bagh Chal is played with four Tigers and twenty Goats. At the start of the game, the tigers are placed in the four corners of the board.

The "goat" player places a goat on the board, which he can't move until all twenty goats have been placed.  The "tiger" player moves one of his tigers from one intersection to another, if there is a line linking them together and also if the intersection spot is free, or even (though he doesn't have to) capture a goat by jumping the tiger over a goat onto a free intersection spot behind the goat, all in a straight line.

The "goat" player, from the twenty-first move onwards, can move his goats from one intersection to another, if there is a line linking them together and also if the final destination spot is free, and try to restrict the tigers' movements.

To win, the goats must immobilise the tigers. The tigers have to capture as many goats as possible so as not to become immobilised. The tigers always have to leave the goats at least one possibility to move. Normally, if the "tiger" player takes five goats, he wins. The repeated repetition of moves is the equivalent to the "goat" player abandoning.

The Board

The board is simple. You can even draw it in the dirt.

It is a square, which is then divided by parallel lines until you have a 5x5 grid.  Traditionally, I'm guessing, you also draw diagonal lines, basically putting an "X" in each grid cell.

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